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Protein Biophysics (Prof. Daniel Otzen)

Daniel Otzen

Professor Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center - INANO-MBG, iNANO-huset
Group members
Research funding

Research focus in brief

Our research activities fall within 3 main areas, which all relate to the study of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein conformational changes, namely membrane protein folding, protein-detergent interactions and protein fibrillation. These areas are linked by a keen interest in understanding the mechanistic and thermodynamic behaviour of proteins in different circumstances by quantifying the strength of internal side-chain interactions as well as contacts with solvent molecules, whether it be detergents, denaturants, stabilizing salts and osmolytes or lipids. Ultimately we hope this will lead to a greater manipulative ability vis-a-vis processes of both basic, pharmaceutical and industrial relevance. The general approach is to use available spectroscopic techniques (fluorescence, CD, stopped-flow, FTIR, NMR and dynamic and static light scattering) to generate data which can be analyzed in a quantitative manner to develop models and mechanisms for conformational changes at the molecular level.  

News

Extracts from rose and olives can prevent parkinson’s. Paper by AU researchers in ACS Chemical Neuroscience. (Photo: Colourbox)

2020.10.07 | iNano

Extracts from rose and olives can prevent parkinson’s

Parkinson’s disease is caused by an imbalance in the brain resulting from alpha-synuclein, a small unstable protein that misfolds and accumulates in clusters and clumps that destroy the brain cells of people with the disease. Researchers from Aarhus University have now discovered that extracts from Damask roses and Koroneiki olives can prevent…

Henrik Birkedal appointed as Professor. (Photo: Lise Balsby, AU Photo)

2020.10.02 | iNano

Henrik Birkedal appointed as Professor

Congratulations to Henrik Birkedal, who on 1st October 2020, was appointed as Professor at Department of Chemistry. Birkedal has been employed at Department of Chemistry as Associate Professor since August 2009, and is heading a research group at iNANO focusing on biological and bioinspired materials.

Pseudo-coloured electron micrograph depicting nanoparticles circulating in the bloodstream along with red blood cells (red) and those sequestered in endothelial cells lining the blood vessel (yellow). (Figure: Yuya Hayashi).

2020.09.30 | iNano

Zebrafish embryos help prove what happens to nanoparticles in the blood

What happens to the nanoparticles when they are injected into the bloodstream, for example, to destroy solid tumours? Hossein Mohammad-Beigi, Duncan Sutherland, and Thomas Boesen have collaborated with colleagues from Department of Molecular Biology & Genetics on tackling such a challenging question using zebrafish embryos as a new study model in…

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