Troels Skrydstrup Group

  • ORGANIC SYNTHESIS
  • Using gaseous molecules in combination with transition metals.
  • Utilizing two-chamber set-up for preparing and using hydrogen, CO2, CO, ethylene and more.
  • Using CO2 as a useful building block for important compounds used on an industrial scale.

News

Professor Gregers Rom Andersen (left), Cryo-EM Facility Manager Thomas Boesen and Professor Poul Nissen in front of the Titan-Krios flagship microscope at Aarhus University (photo: Lisbeth Heilesen).

2018.11.08 | Research News

DKK 30 million for high-tech electron microscopes for research in molecular cell biology

The Minister for Higher Education and Science has approved funding for three new research infrastructures, of which DKK 30.76 million goes to EMBION – a research infrastructure for cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) on biological materials.

2018.11.01 | iNano

New insight into the mechanism of the drug against sclerosis and psoriasis

Professor Poul Nissen and his research team with contributions from e.g. Kurt Gothelf's laboratories have provided fundamental new insight into the mechanism of the medical drug dimethyl fumarate, which is the active component of important treatments for multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The results contribute to the development of new strategies…

3D print of the Sodium Potassium Pump at the exhibition ‘Profession and Passion – a Life in Science’ at Steno Museum, Aarhus University. iNANO researchers, Ebbe Sloth Andersen, Mette Jepsen and Poul Nissen contribute to the exhibition. Photo: Ida Marie Jensen (AU Photo)

2018.10.12 | iNano

iNANO researchers contribute to exhibition at Steno Museum

The exhibition ‘Profession and Passion – a Life in Science’ is launched at the Steno Museum, Aarhus University. iNANO researchers have contributed to the exhibition on what impels researchers and how science and passion live alongside each other.

AU Researchers perform nanodissection using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and unveil how cable bacteria conduct energy. The image shows micrograph (left) of filamentous Desulfobulbaceae and AFM topography (Right) og the outer membrane after nanodissection. Image: Mingdong Dong
The left column, bacterial cable under optical microscopy, which is hybridized with a specific ELF654 FISH and DAPI probe. The middle column, three kinds of cell junctions. The right column, AFM topography and Young’s modulus (logarithm) map of inside of outer membrane after nanodissection. The black dashed arrows indicate cell junction. The solid arrows indicate one string attaching at the inner face of outer membrane. Image: Mingdong Dong
Associate Professor Mingdong publish in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on in vitro single-cell dissection of cable bacteria. Photo: Maria Randima (AU Photo)

2018.10.12 | iNano

Nanodissection unveils how bacteria conduct energy

Recent discoveries show that cable bacteria can function as electrical wires, however it is unclear how it is possible to have long-range electron transfer through these cobweb thin bacterial chains. Using Atomic Force Microscopy as a nanoscalpel AU researchers now bring us closer to understanding the interior structure of the bacteria.

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