Protein Biophysics (Prof. Daniel Otzen)

Daniel Otzen

Professor Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center - INANO-MBG, iNANO-huset
M
H 1592, 224
P +4587156741
P +4520725238
Group members
Research funding

Research focus in brief

Our research activities fall within 3 main areas, which all relate to the study of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein conformational changes, namely membrane protein folding, protein-detergent interactions and protein fibrillation. These areas are linked by a keen interest in understanding the mechanistic and thermodynamic behaviour of proteins in different circumstances by quantifying the strength of internal side-chain interactions as well as contacts with solvent molecules, whether it be detergents, denaturants, stabilizing salts and osmolytes or lipids. Ultimately we hope this will lead to a greater manipulative ability vis-a-vis processes of both basic, pharmaceutical and industrial relevance. The general approach is to use available spectroscopic techniques (fluorescence, CD, stopped-flow, FTIR, NMR and dynamic and static light scattering) to generate data which can be analyzed in a quantitative manner to develop models and mechanisms for conformational changes at the molecular level.  

News

Associate Professor Victoria Birkedal receives VILLUM Experiment grant for the project "Self-assembled polymer chips for efficient devices". (Photo: Maria Randima, AU Communikation)

2018.09.12 | iNano

iNANO researcher receives 2 million DKK for testing a daring idea

The VILLUM Foundation has granted a total of 100 million for daring technical and scientific research ideas. Associate Professor Victoria Birkedal gets a share of the millions for her project: Self-assembled polymer chips for efficient devices.

AU researchers have completed a new successful screening strategy where they have identified novel inhibitors of αlpha-synuclein aggregation. This may help develop a cure for Parkinson's disease. (Image: Colourbox.com)
Graphical overview of a screening of 746,000 compounds for inhibitory effects of alpha-synuclein aggregation. (Graphics: Professor Daniel Otzen)

2018.09.10 | iNano

New high-throughput screening study may pave the way for future Parkinson’s disease therapy

Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease; currently there is no cure. Aggregation of the protein α-synuclein plays a key role in this disease. Together with a US drug company, AU researchers have now carried out a new screening strategy which has identified novel and structurally diverse aggregation inhibitors.

AU researchers publish on new atomic-scale insight into the active interface between Cobalt oxides and gold in the effort to optimize the technology of splitting water. Co-O bilayer nanoislands on Au(111) in STM and structural model. Graphics: AU

2018.09.04 | iNano

Advancing the technology on electrochemical water splitting for sustainable energy

AU researchers reveal new atomic-scale insight into the active interface between Cobalt oxides and gold in the effort to optimize the technology of splitting water, which has the potential of providing an almost unlimited source of renewable resources.

Showing results 25 to 27 of 209

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next

Recent publications

Sort by: Date | Author | Title