Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Nanoscience

Join iNANO, an internationally recognized Nanoscience center conducting science at the highest international level


News

Associate Professor Ken Howard and his research team join forces with world leading scientists to develop new platform for tunable immunotherapy. (Image: Nature Commun Biol 4, Article no. 310 (2021))
Associate Ken Howard is head of the Bioengineered Drug Designs Lab at Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University. (Photo: Maria Randima, AU Photo)

2021.03.11 | iNano

Albumin solution to an unmet need in cancer immunotherapy

AU researchers join forces with world leaders to develop a new albumin-based platform for long-acting, efficient, and safer immunotherapy. Assoc. Prof. Ken Howard and his research team have published their findings in a new Nature family journal.

Jørgen Kjems (left) and Morten Venø are partners in a new consortium, PRIME, that will seek to develop biological nano-implants - based on naturally occurring signaling pathways - that can help patients with epilepsy. Photo: Anne Færch Nielsen.

2021.03.11 | iNano

Developing biological nano-implants to block epileptic seizures

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases and seizures can be debilitating. Unfortunately, treatments to prevent these seizures are lacking. Jørgen Kjems from iNANO and the Department of Molecular Biology at Aarhus University and the AU spinout company, OMIICS, are partners in a new consortium, PRIME, that will seek to develop…

Unraveling the three-dimensional structure of the glycine transporter, researchers have now come a big step closer to understanding the regulation of glycine in the brain. These result open up opportunities to find effective drugs that inhibit GlyT1 function, with major implications for the treatment of schizophrenia and other mental disorders. Figure: Azadeh Shahsavar

2021.03.04 | iNano

Structure determination of the glycine transporter GlyT1 opens new avenues in development of psychiatric drugs

Glycine can stimulate or inhibit neurons in the brain, thereby controlling complex functions. Unraveling the three-dimensional structure of the glycine transporter, researchers have now come a big step closer to understanding the regulation of glycine in the brain. These results, which have been published in Nature, open up opportunities to find…

Showing results 28 to 30 of 324

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next

Follow iNANO: