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Controlled CO2 reduction to either CO or formic acid dependent on the catalyst design. (Graphics: Copyright © 2020, Journal of the American Chemical Society)
PhD Student Joakim B. Jakobsen, PhD Student Monica R. Madsen, and Post doc Magnus H. Rønne who collaborated to conduct the experimental work at Aarhus University, published in Journal of the American Chemical Society. (Photo: private)

2020.03.06 | iNano

Controlling the conversion of CO2 with new catalysts

Converting CO2 into more useful products offers an interesting strategy to mitigate climate issues while producing value added chemicals. Researchers from the Carbon Dioxide Activation Center (CADIAC) have discovered how the ligand scaffold around a manganese catalyst can be modified to control the selectivity of the products generated via…

New technique for isotope labeling with CO2 by Troels Skrydstrups research team published in Angewandte Chemie Int. Ed. (Graphics: Troels Skrydstrup)

2020.02.28 | iNano

New Carbon Isotope Labeling Technique

Carbon isotope labeling of new drug candidates is an important process for allowing preclinical and clinical investigations on a specific compound’s distribution, metabolism, and toxicity. AU researchers have found a new method for this with broad applicability.

Results published by AU researchers reveal that surfactant-mediated unfolding and refolding of proteins are complex processes with several structures present, and rearrangements occur on time scales from sub-milliseconds to minutes. (Image: Reproduced with permission from the Royal Society of Chemistry).
PhD Jannik Pedersen, PhD Jeppe Lyngsø, Professor Jan Skov Pedersen, Professor Daniel E. Otzen have published a new study in the renowned journal, Chemical Science on understanding how surfactant and protein cooperate in the process of unfolding and refolding of proteins. (Photo: Maria Randima and Jesper Rais, AU Photo)

2020.02.07 | iNano

Caught soap-handed: Understanding how soap molecules help proteins get in and out of shape

Controlling protein structure is crucial in the production of detergents and cosmetics. Up to now we have not had a clear understanding of how soap molecules and proteins work together to change protein structure. Now AU researchers have succeeded in creating a detailed picture of both unfolding and refolding of a protein by soap molecules on the…

Mogens Christensen (left) is conducting research to develop more efficient and sustainable magnets. Among those he is working with is Peter Kjeldsteen (right), head of development at the company Sintex. The black rings in the picture are magnets for electric motors. Photo: Dorthe Lundh

2020.02.06 | iNano

From minus to plus – new magnet technology enhances green power

There are magnets in virtually all modern electrical equipment. However, the current versions are often based on metals with heavy impacts on the environment. Associate Professor Mogens Christensen is researching a new and cleaner magnet technology; research which also opens up for new opportunities to exploit and store electricity.

13 iNANO associated researchers have been granted DKK 8 million from the Carlsberg Foundation for research infrastructure.

2020.01.20 | iNano

DKK 8 million for research infrastructure

13 iNANO associated researchers have been granted DKK 8 million from the Carlsberg Foundation for research infrastructure

Henrik Birkedal, Merete Bilde, Tobias Weidner, Thomas Boesen, Rikke Louise Meyer, and Alexander Zelikin receive DKK 36 million in total from the Novo Nordisk Foundation for infrastructure, studies in microbial aerosols, and the battle against antimicrobial resistance. (Photos: Lars Kruse, Jesper Rais, and Lise Balsby AU Photo)

2019.12.20 | iNano

The Novo Nordisk Foundation grants DKK 36 M for iNANO researchers

Henrik Birkedal, Merete Bilde, Tobias Weidner, Thomas Boesen, Rikke Louise Meyer, and Alexander Zelikin receive DKK 36 million in total from the Novo Nordisk Foundation for infrastructure for studying bone structure, studies in microbial aerosols, and the battle against antimicrobial resistance.

Professor Troels Skrydstrup has been interviewed by Chemistry Views (Wiley) on his work in organic synthesis. (Photo: ChemicalViews)

2019.12.19 | iNano

Safe reactions with dangerous gases

Professor Troels Skrydstrup has been interviewed by Chemistry Views (Wiley) about his successful work in organic synthesis, organometallic chemistry, and especially running safe reactions with dangerous but very useful gases, like carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide. Hear about his research plans and why Denmark is a nice place to do research.

There is a great need for the kind of point-specific forms of treatment that Associate Professor Menglin Chen now aims to develop. Photo: Ida Jensen, AU Foto.

2019.12.19 | iNano

Injecting ‘solar cells’ into the body to regenerate brain cells

Associate Professor Menglin Chen has received a major grant from the Carlsberg Foundation to develop a completely new method of regenerating brain and heart cells. The method uses water-based nanofibers coated with organic photovoltaic nanomaterials to create light controlled neural stimulating scaffolds inside the body.

In the future, the newly discovered mechanism will potentially enable insertion of the sensor specifically into diseased cells and may allow diagnosis at the single cell level. Figure: Rasmus Peter Thomsen/AU.
The researchers from Aarhus University behind the scientific article (from left): Rasmus P. Thomsen, Jørgen Kjems and Rasmus Schøler Sørensen. Photo: Anne Færch Nielsen/AU.

2019.12.13 | iNano

Researchers create synthetic nanopores made from DNA

A scientific collaboration led by researchers at iNANO/Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Aarhus University and the Department of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen has resulted in the construction of a synthetic DNA nanopore capable of selectively translocating protein-size macromolecules across lipid bilayers.

Poul Nissen receives DKK 40 million (USD 6 million) from the Lundbeck Foundation's professor programme to conduct ground-breaking brain research. Photo: Lisbeth Heilesen

2019.12.10 | iNano

Poul Nissen receives the Lundbeck Foundation's professor grant

The Lundbeck Foundation is awarding grants worth DKK 232 million (USD 34 million) to six leading neuroscientists. The LF Professorships programme is the Foundation’s largest grant allocation to date.

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